Travel Outside Australia

Updated: Dec 31, 2020

If you travel outside Australia, you may get sick from a number of diseases that are preventable by vaccination. Different vaccines are needed for certain countries. You should consult with one of our travel vaccination expert 6 to 12 weeks before you travel. Don’t wait until the last minute to visit your doctor to discuss what vaccines you need for your trip. You might need several doses of a particular vaccine. You might also need time after immunisation for your body to develop full immunity. (www.http://health.gov.au)


#travel #vaccine


Questions and Answers

Are there any side effects from vaccines?

After a vaccination a person might have some redness, swelling and soreness at the site the vaccine was given. Some people may get a fever. Mostly this does not last very long and can be treated. You should feel better 1-2 days after an injection. Your child might be a bit unsettled or unhappy after their vaccinations. You should remain at our clinic for 15 mins after the vaccine is given, in case of a severe reaction.


How does vaccination work?

Vaccination is the process that makes your body think it has an infection without causing the symptoms of the infection to make you sick. This gives your body a memory to fight off the real infection if you are in contact with it.


Is vaccination compulsory?

No. Vaccination is not compulsory in australia. If a child is not vaccinated against a disease and there is a case of the disease at the child care centre or school, the child may be made to stay home until it is OK for them to return. Being up to date with immunisations is a requirement for childcare enrolment.


How safe are vaccines?

All vaccines in Australia are tested to make sure they are safe and good quality before they are allowed to be used.


What can i do to stop any discomfort after vaccination?

Paracetamol can be given to ease any discomfort and fever. Doses should be given following the instruction on the pack. If your kid is hot, do not put on lots of clothes or blankets. You can also put a cold wet cloth on the injection site. If the discomfort lasts for more than 2 days, fever is high and not responding to paracetamol or if you are worried at all you should see your doctor.


Useful Links

National Immunisation Program "Questions about Vaccination"

http://www.health.gov.au/sites/default/files/questions-about-vaccination.pdf


#travel vaccination #flu vaccination #immunisation #Neutral Bay


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